Fishertown Rubaiyat

 

view through a snow covered lane in the Fishertown

 

The smaller lanes still pure with snow
where lanterns cast their final glow
the moon will blink before she sleeps
the blue sky’s here to steal her show.

The gritter weaves through narrow streets
winter’s flown here now and greets
the wood smoke curling into day
through chimney pots, their smell so sweet.

The fisher folk who used to stay
in homes along the coast and bay
would know how strong the wind can blow
the way life changes, when we play.

Β© Xenia Tran

 

view through a narrow snow covered street in the Fishertown

 

view down a snow covered street in the Fishertows at day break

Frank at dVerse Poets invites us to write a Rubaiyat with a Winter theme and I’ve created an interlocking Rubaiyat following the aaba, bbcb, ccac format.

Wishing you all a very happy Friday and a wonderful weekend,

with love from Xenia xxx

 

Photographs by Xenia Tran, edited in lr.

Camera: Canon Powershot SX60 HS, Settings: f/5 – 1/20 s – ISO 1250, f/4 – 1/40 s – ISO 640 and f/5.6 – 1/100 s – ISO 640.

 

dVerse Poets: Poetry Forms – The Rubaiyat

Rag Tag Daily Prompt: Fish

 

Author: Tranature - quiet moments in nature

The stories, poems and photographs on Tranature are the original creative work of Xenia Tran, inspired by the natural surroundings of the Scottish Highlands.

64 thoughts on “Fishertown Rubaiyat”

    1. Thank you so much for your kind words dear Eliza πŸ’œ We have grit boxes on the corner to get grit for the narrow lanes and pavements and gritters who drive through the wider streets, releasing grit as they go. I’d never heard of ‘sander’ before, thank you for teaching me a new word too! πŸ™‚πŸ’– xxx

      Liked by 1 person

        1. Thank you Dwight, the word ‘grit’ evolved from the old English ‘greot’ (which was used to describe sand, dust or gravel), which in turn evolved from the Germanic ‘greutan’ (crushed rock), the old Frisian ‘gret’ and old Norse ‘grjot’ (rock, stone). The grit we use here today comprises of crushed rock salt and gravel. It’s possible ashes were used here in the olden days too! πŸ™‚

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    1. Thank you so much for your kind words dear Dwight πŸ™‚ In a general sense the final line relates to the difference between work and play and every reader can attach their own meaning to this. For the original inhabitants of the Fishertown life was often tough and at the mercy of wind and sea. Men, women and children all worked hard. Especially for the working children, life was very different when they could play πŸ™‚

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much for your kind words dear Kathy, the Scottish Highlands have a way of calling us πŸ˜‰πŸ’–

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    1. Thank you so much for your kind words dear Cathy πŸ’œ Hope you are all warm and cosy and much love from our house to yours πŸ€—πŸ’–πŸ• xxx

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much for your kind words dear Laurie, it’s part of a conservation area and there’s so much history here πŸ™‚πŸ’– xxx

      Liked by 1 person

  1. Stunning images to illustrate your words. But the words stand alone to create a picture in my mind’s eye. Love the first stanza and most especially the use of the word β€œgritter”.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much for your kind words dear Helen, much love to you and Dylan from all of us here πŸ€—πŸΎπŸ’–πŸΎ xxx

      Liked by 1 person

  2. I like the variety of visuals you give us here, each holding more to wonder and imagine. The last stanza reminds me of Newfoundland where we visited last year. Many tiny fishing villages along the ocean that have dwindled in population over time.

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    1. Thank you so much for your kind words dear Mish πŸ’œ Those fishing villages sound lovely and I hope some of the people who left will return and live there again one day πŸ™‚πŸ’– xxx

      Liked by 1 person

  3. I’m afraid I’ve got around to reading a little bit late, Xenia. So glad I checked back as your Rubaiyat is delightful and I love the pictures. Is that where you live? So beautiful in the snow and I imagine in all other kinds of weather. I especially love the stanza about the fisher folk. xx

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much for your kind words dear Kim and yes, this is where we stay. These were originally fishermen’s cottages and some of their descendants still live here. It’s been lovely to hear their stories and in the Winter months especially, it feels like stepping back in time πŸ™‚πŸ’– xxx

      Liked by 1 person

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